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STREETS IS WEARING

STREETS IS WEARING

By Bobby Hundreds

Don’t get me wrong. I may lean heavier on the skateboarding-speak when writing about the progression of modern “streetwear,” but needless to say, hip-hop has played a crucial role in it’s development.

I’ve had these Rap Pages magazines since 1993 and ’94, and they shed light on a turning point in the youth-culture apparel world. Clothes that weren’t so necessarily hip-hop, nor skate, and not completely inspired by any one subculture, demographic, or niche market, was finding its way onto the backs of kids of all backgrounds. While brands like Cross Colours were touting “No Color Lines,” it was an opportune moment for a more open-minded approach to the young, fashion-conscious, consumer. Nowadays, it’s commonplace to see the rap-enthusiast wearing the same t-shirt as a punk, but these pages document the early stages of this accepting attitude. And it was the rap scene’s first taste of brand names like GAT, Sjobeck, Stussy, and Freshjive.

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This issue breaks down Gypsies and Thieves, Conart, and West Coast style. Right on.

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by bobbyhundreds

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