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KILLIN 'EM ALL.

KILLIN 'EM ALL.

By Bobby Hundreds

Speaking of Black Friday openings, if you were anywhere near Fairfax that day, you saw the line at the new Odd Future pop-up shop rolling down the block.

I likes Lucas because Lucas likes hardcore.

What’s former The Hundreds Santa Monica manager Brick Stowell doing here? After tour managing OF for the last several months, he’s back in LA opening up this space. He also just released his photography book for Odd Future, alongside other contributors like Lego, Sagan, and Julian Berman. And speaking of Brick’s photography, I hope you’re keeping up with it over on his The Hundreds blog HERE.

Why..so.. serious? TACO TIME.

And this is why I can appreciate Odd Future.

They make everyone uncomfortable. Everybody. The parents, the music industry, the street culture universe, ME, the bright-eyed kids who come to their shows and get jump-kicked by Left Brain in the face. They make the older generations uneasy. And by “older generations,” I specifically mean any tastemaker, coolguy type over the age of 25 who fawn over the rap collective (without actually knowing any of their music) or diss OF because these kids make them feel irrelevant, out of the loop, out of touch…old. A year ago, Odd Future was a hot-button hashtag amongst the elitist L.A. music snob crowd. 6 months before that, they were just like any of these other high school kids trolling Fairfax with skateboards and ill-fitting Streetwear. They were ignored, dismissed. They were marginalized.

And now, they’re running the show. Streetwear is back, FAIRFAX is back…in a big big way, and you’d be stupid to not admit that Odd Future played a big big role in it. The best part is these guys don’t give a flying OF what you think, what I’m saying about them right now on this blog, how anybody did it before them, how the game is supposed to be played. To them, there aren’t even rules to break — there’s no field, there’s just them with baseball bats, in a glass room – they don’t see walls or limitations, and they’re swinging with reckless abandon. (Sometimes they’re aiming for all the people who doubted them, ignored, dismissed, and marginalized them)

And this is why I love Odd Future. Because they are doing everything right, the way a teenager is meant to be angry and rebellious, the way the youth are meant to upset the setup. They’re the lost boys for a Tumblr generation, a tribe of parent-less misfits who now have a share of real estate in Streetwear’s global capital. The music industry, the street apparel business, anyone who’s remotely tied to youth culture, they’re all falling over themselves to figure these kids out, decipher their code, rub shoulders with them, own them, or on the contrary, hate on them. Look how insecure grown men can be.

But they’ll continue on. As new generations do. Out with the old and in with the new.

by bobbyhundreds

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